impulsereader: (Book Art 1)
Right. Laurence Fox officially has the same voice as Benedict Cumberbatch. OK, not the actual same since that would involve a shared larynx as well as other impossible things, but so close that both times I've run across him on the soundtrack of my television while I've been very busy typing, I've perked up my ears and thought to myself, "Not Mr Cumberbatch, but pretty much, yeah, very nearly the same voice."

Mr Fox is apparently very busy being married to and producing babies with Billie Piper (who has the worst posture in the world when she is not playing a part) in the English countryside as opposed to filming constantly and making it big in America; otherwise, their larynx (it's like deer, roll with it) are inseparable.
impulsereader: (Book Art 1)
I've started up Foyle's War and been rewarded with both David Tennant and Roger Allam all in the first series. :-) Oooo... plus Amanda Root in the next episode.
impulsereader: (Default)
This weekend the universe told me to post about how awesome Robert Carlyle is. It probably felt the need to prod me because I recently finished The Last Enemy and haven't yet publicly squeeed about how awesome it is that his character had not one line of dialogue in the first episode, but was still the scariest character pretty much ever.  I just typed out a huge spoiler and then backspaced it.  I loved the entire thing, and hopefully there will be spoilers in the comments here as anyone else who watched it chimes in, but I'm going to leave the body of the entry spoiler-free, just in case.

So I was in an art supply store just wandering around looking for present ideas, and I picked up this book:



and flipped to the middle-ish, caught a flash, ended up a few pages earlier, and thought, 'hey, that was Robert Carlyle'.  Sure enough, one of the 30 Great Ads was the Johnnie Walker ad - The Man Who Walked Around the World.

I'm sure most of you have probably seen it, but it's totally worth a re-watch and, hey, he did it in one take, so he deserves a little extra worship from us.  Edited to add - oh dear, apparently RC did any number of takes and was willing to keep going - so he not only presents us with a single, flawless take in the end, but we can now all pine away for the outtakes...



Oh, hey, is anyone watching Perception on TNT?  I was all - Hey!  A Numb3rs knockoff!  Sweet! - so now I'm catching up.
impulsereader: (Default)
This weekend the universe told me to post about how awesome Robert Carlyle is. It probably felt the need to prod me because I recently finished The Last Enemy and haven't yet publicly squeeed about how awesome it is that his character had not one line of dialogue in the first episode, but was still the scariest character pretty much ever.  I just typed out a huge spoiler and then backspaced it.  I loved the entire thing, and hopefully there will be spoilers in the comments here as anyone else who watched it chimes in, but I'm going to leave the body of the entry spoiler-free, just in case.

So I was in an art supply store just wandering around looking for present ideas, and I picked up this book:



and flipped to the middle-ish, caught a flash, ended up a few pages earlier, and thought, 'hey, that was Robert Carlyle'.  Sure enough, one of the 30 Great Ads was the Johnnie Walker ad - The Man Who Walked Around the World.

I'm sure most of you have probably seen it, but it's totally worth a re-watch and, hey, he did it in one take, so he deserves a little extra worship from us.  Edited to add - oh dear, apparently RC did any number of takes and was willing to keep going - so he not only presents us with a single, flawless take in the end, but we can now all pine away for the outtakes...



Oh, hey, is anyone watching Perception on TNT?  I was all - Hey!  A Numb3rs knockoff!  Sweet! - so now I'm catching up.
impulsereader: (Default)
I’ve just spent a long time watching my cursor blink. This was after I’d begun a rec/review of this book and then decided to start over. The problem is very likely that Douglas Adams is impossible to follow in any capacity. I apparently think that I am one of the funniest things to happen to Earth since clowning came into fashion at the beginning of time, but even my brain admits that there is no way I can write a competent, funny review of this book which has any chance of getting across how perfect and wonderful it is. So instead of reading the blather which follows, you should really just get yourself the book and read it instead. http://www.amazon.com/Last-Chance-See-Douglas-Adams/dp/0345371984/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1340219152&sr=1-1&keywords=last+chance+to+see Astonishingly, my local used book store has gifted me with at least two copies. I have a hard time believing anyone who has read this book was willing to let it out of their sight afterwards. But – there is some benefit to continue reading if you so choose, because this all leads to bonus Stephen Fry at the end, saving you the research.

This book was born of what Adams calls ‘some sort of journalistic accident’. It was the very happiest of accidents, because it produced a work which casts Adams in a role for which he is perfectly suited – that of translator and interpreter. In 1985 a magazine sent him, along with Zoologist Mark Carwardine, to Madagascar. Their task was to seek a glimpse of an aye-aye, a very rare lemur, in the wild. In a precipitous moment which surely indicated from the start that this partnership was charmed – Mark and Douglas managed to spot the animal, at night (the aye-aye is nocturnal), in the rain, and their photographer captured the image for posterity. It had been many years since anyone else had laid eyes on an aye-aye in the wild. Adams is hooked, and he and Mark make an appointment to seek out more endangered species around the world – in three years, because of some pesky books he has to write beforehand.

What follows is a rousing tale of travel to places which are very definitely not tourist friendly in a time when travellers had to do quite a lot of ‘telexing’ to make arrangements, and the picture of what you would encounter once you arrived could be unbelievably distorted from the reality in which you eventually found yourself. For example, conflicting reports abound regarding at what point they will need to acquire a three-day-dead goat in order to bait a Komodo Dragon – whether or not they will be forced to share a choppy ride in a small boat with the dead goat then becomes a point of serious concern.

While in China in search of the Baiji – the Yangtze River dolphin – Adams decides it would be a good idea for them to put a microphone into the water so that they can get an idea of what the dolphins are up against. The animals are endangered because the noise pollution in the river messes with their sonar and they are consequently being chopped up by boat propellers at an astounding rate. This leads to a hilarious hunt for condoms carried out in three languages, one of them sign.

Only Douglas Adams could have written a book so heartrendingly bleak as he ponders the fate of these species and yet so damn funny that you will be laughing out loud – I promise. Near the end, he translates to a readership of laymen the convoluted world of the scientist conservationists who are working on these projects going on around the world who are desperately trying to keep endangered species from tipping over into extinction. For a real-life look at some of the work being done today in this area, (though this particular video is focusing on collection of specimens rather than the endangered aspect of the equation) go watch this rather wonderful video – if you will be upset by the sight of dead birds and rodents respectfully collected for scientific research and the benefit of future generations of both animals and people, please skip this portion of today’s lesson. :-) http://fieldmuseum.org/explore/multimedia/film-discovering-mount-gorongosa

And as a lovely follow up and tribute to his friend, Stephen Fry also travelled with Mark for a stint. http://www.bbc.co.uk/lastchancetosee/archive.shtml Oh! And if you go there you can listen to the original radio show that Douglas Adams did! Score! As soon as I have speakers I’m on that!
impulsereader: (Default)
I’ve just spent a long time watching my cursor blink. This was after I’d begun a rec/review of this book and then decided to start over. The problem is very likely that Douglas Adams is impossible to follow in any capacity. I apparently think that I am one of the funniest things to happen to Earth since clowning came into fashion at the beginning of time, but even my brain admits that there is no way I can write a competent, funny review of this book which has any chance of getting across how perfect and wonderful it is. So instead of reading the blather which follows, you should really just get yourself the book and read it instead. http://www.amazon.com/Last-Chance-See-Douglas-Adams/dp/0345371984/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1340219152&sr=1-1&keywords=last+chance+to+see Astonishingly, my local used book store has gifted me with at least two copies. I have a hard time believing anyone who has read this book was willing to let it out of their sight afterwards. But – there is some benefit to continue reading if you so choose, because this all leads to bonus Stephen Fry at the end, saving you the research.

This book was born of what Adams calls ‘some sort of journalistic accident’. It was the very happiest of accidents, because it produced a work which casts Adams in a role for which he is perfectly suited – that of translator and interpreter. In 1985 a magazine sent him, along with Zoologist Mark Carwardine, to Madagascar. Their task was to seek a glimpse of an aye-aye, a very rare lemur, in the wild. In a precipitous moment which surely indicated from the start that this partnership was charmed – Mark and Douglas managed to spot the animal, at night (the aye-aye is nocturnal), in the rain, and their photographer captured the image for posterity. It had been many years since anyone else had laid eyes on an aye-aye in the wild. Adams is hooked, and he and Mark make an appointment to seek out more endangered species around the world – in three years, because of some pesky books he has to write beforehand.

What follows is a rousing tale of travel to places which are very definitely not tourist friendly in a time when travellers had to do quite a lot of ‘telexing’ to make arrangements, and the picture of what you would encounter once you arrived could be unbelievably distorted from the reality in which you eventually found yourself. For example, conflicting reports abound regarding at what point they will need to acquire a three-day-dead goat in order to bait a Komodo Dragon – whether or not they will be forced to share a choppy ride in a small boat with the dead goat then becomes a point of serious concern.

While in China in search of the Baiji – the Yangtze River dolphin – Adams decides it would be a good idea for them to put a microphone into the water so that they can get an idea of what the dolphins are up against. The animals are endangered because the noise pollution in the river messes with their sonar and they are consequently being chopped up by boat propellers at an astounding rate. This leads to a hilarious hunt for condoms carried out in three languages, one of them sign.

Only Douglas Adams could have written a book so heartrendingly bleak as he ponders the fate of these species and yet so damn funny that you will be laughing out loud – I promise. Near the end, he translates to a readership of laymen the convoluted world of the scientist conservationists who are working on these projects going on around the world who are desperately trying to keep endangered species from tipping over into extinction. For a real-life look at some of the work being done today in this area, (though this particular video is focusing on collection of specimens rather than the endangered aspect of the equation) go watch this rather wonderful video – if you will be upset by the sight of dead birds and rodents respectfully collected for scientific research and the benefit of future generations of both animals and people, please skip this portion of today’s lesson. :-) http://fieldmuseum.org/explore/multimedia/film-discovering-mount-gorongosa

And as a lovely follow up and tribute to his friend, Stephen Fry also travelled with Mark for a stint. http://www.bbc.co.uk/lastchancetosee/archive.shtml Oh! And if you go there you can listen to the original radio show that Douglas Adams did! Score! As soon as I have speakers I’m on that!
impulsereader: (Default)
I pulled up this Masterpiece Contemporary The Last Enemy off a Netflix search for streamable Robert Carlyle, and who did I find in the lead role?  Sherlock.  I consider this a pretty sweet deal.

Also, halfway through the first ep Woman From His Past Who Will Turn Out To Be More Than She Seems shows up and she’s sporting a blonde bob, dressed all in black - coat with turtleneck and a huge silver brooch, and my first thought is Psi Corps - run!  It is never too late to watch B5, the eps look less dated than you would expect.

To keep things balanced within our crime fighting duo, I also recently finished up listening to the Hitchhiker’s Guide during my commute, most of which are read by Watson, who is not quite married to Jackson Brodie’s potential new squeeze, DC Louise Monroe, on Case Histories - if I’m so lucky that they go ahead with a new series, bringing us neatly back around to Masterpiece Mystery.  Having Jason Isaacs on Awake is nice, but I prefer him not sounding american, though he does a good accent.
impulsereader: (Default)
I pulled up this Masterpiece Contemporary The Last Enemy off a Netflix search for streamable Robert Carlyle, and who did I find in the lead role?  Sherlock.  I consider this a pretty sweet deal.

Also, halfway through the first ep Woman From His Past Who Will Turn Out To Be More Than She Seems shows up and she’s sporting a blonde bob, dressed all in black - coat with turtleneck and a huge silver brooch, and my first thought is Psi Corps - run!  It is never too late to watch B5, the eps look less dated than you would expect.

To keep things balanced within our crime fighting duo, I also recently finished up listening to the Hitchhiker’s Guide during my commute, most of which are read by Watson, who is not quite married to Jackson Brodie’s potential new squeeze, DC Louise Monroe, on Case Histories - if I’m so lucky that they go ahead with a new series, bringing us neatly back around to Masterpiece Mystery.  Having Jason Isaacs on Awake is nice, but I prefer him not sounding american, though he does a good accent.

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